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Saturday, July 7, 2012

Mainstream Movie Bondage vs. Kinky Internet Bondage


Straightjacket, ball gag and nudity notwithstanding, this Kink.com model is in control and totally into the moment. Image source: Sex and Submission.com.


Over on the Bondage Blog they've found a very thought provoking article on the psychological difference between doing kinky scenes in mainstream films and doing kinky scenes for Internet porn, from the point of view of the actresses.

The essence of the article is that the Internet porn actresses typically are involved in their scenes, and "own" them psychologically, even though they are tied up, gagged, etc., they still have a sense of being in charge (at least, at the decent sites like Kink, Inc., knowing the Internets I am sure that somewhere out there an Internet porn producer is doing Everything Wrong). Whereas Hollywood stars often use booze and drugs and so forth to take themselves "out" of kinky scenes or scenes involving nudity and sex.

And they often are emotionally upset by those scenes as well, whereas for the porn stars it's all in a day's work.


Annabella Sciorra says she spent 12 hours hogtied during the filming of this scene from the mainstream thriller "Whispers In The Dark." She says it pissed her off, and I believe her about that, but ... 12 hours? o0 Image source: Damsel in Distress Interviews site..


I have three thoughts on the topic. One, I think mainstream actresses often play up the difficulties of such scenes as a way of promoting the movies. As Exhibit A I offer the DiD Interviews site, an excellent resource that features interviews of mainstream actresses about their experience in making mainstream scenes.

The particular interview I linked to is of Amanda Fuller talking about the difficulties involved in being hogtied in a mainstream film, feeling her arms and legs going numb after just ten minutes of it. She played up the discomfort and the potential danger ("I started to think, "I'm actually in danger.") I'm sure she DID get numb and maybe a little scared, but point is, she was likely playing it up to promote the film as dark, edgy, scary, because if you read the interviews, you'll see that most of the actresses are doing just that.

Secondly, it might be more dangerous to be an actress on a mainstream film than an internet porn star on a site like Kink, which is considered by most to be topnotch in regard to worker safety. I've had a lot of fun mocking the stupid bondage in Hollywood films on my Loosie Awards site, but if the stupid rules in respect to Loosie bondage in Hollywood films, and it surely does often enough, then it probably also rules in regard to all their bondage scenes.

The people at Kink.com know what they are doing, and so do the models, they know how to avoid nerve damage, joint damage, and any pain that gets inflicted is generally intentional and carefully, um, apportioned. I have all kinds of doubt that mainstream crews have that skill set.

Thirdly, as I've noted in other essays, there is an almost dreamlike sloppiness to the bondage in mainstream scenes. I ascribe it to the theory that the filmmakers don't want to directly confront the sexual aspects of bondage scenes, which are present even in a straight-up damsel in distress scene. The actresses may be doing the same thing. It's hard to say, because I tend to distrust anything that appears in mainstream media, which is basically all about the money.

One final thought, and that is that the article that sparked all these thoughts, "Why I Wince Through Hollywood Sex Scenes And Not Porn" is not published on a porn site, it's a women-oriented site that does the usual fashion and shopping stuff. And yet Sarah Woolley's writing has a certain clarity and reasonableness with regard to porn you don't see outside adult websites, generally. Three possible explanations: first, Sarah Woolley is a much smarter and better thinker than most; second, it's a UK site, they just are not as hung up about porn and sex as Americans, and third, maybe 50 Shades of Gray is making editors at women's sites sit up and take notice and let their writers speak a little more freely about bondage and such, rather than cribbing it in the usual "eew"-speak they have used in the past.

Maybe it's a little of all three explanations.

In any event, check out the sites, read the article, see what you think. Bon appetit!

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